Actor in struggle to save daughter’s life

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By Tade Makinde

It’s not the best of time for the chief whip of Oyo State branch of the Association of Nigerian Theatre Practitioners (ANTP) as his three-month-old baby girl, Faheedat Motunrayo Salami, is struggling to survive after being diagnosed with congestive cardiac failure. Worried about his daughter’s fragile life, Ismaila Salami has combed Ibadan for N3million demanded by the University College Hospital (UCH) for surgery, but his meagre earnings as an actor and even the efforts of ANTP members were to no avail as he has yet to raise a dime since he began soliciting on October 2, 2013.

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In a document from UCH, signed by Dr Adebayo, when Faheedat was first seen at the cardiology clinic at three months of age, she was in respiratory distress.

The cough was reportedly associated with fast breathing, but no bluish discolouration of her lips was observed. The extant episode was associated with fever.

She was managed for bronchopneumonia at the  hospital.

Examination revealed that the infant weighed in  at 3.6kg (60% of expected) with no dysrnorphic features. She was in respiratory distress and had no added sounds. The first heart sound was normal while the second heart sound had an ejection click accompanying it. There was a grade 3/6 systolic murmur heard at the left sternal edge.

The medical report on Faheedat, after electrocardiogram, showed features of right ventricular hypertrophy, while chocardiogram showed features in keeping severe pulmonary stenosis.

She was subsequently  hospitalised for congestive cardiac failure. Her growth potentials and subsequent well-being depend on timely and appropriate intervention. She has been commenced on diuretics and captopril for symptomatic review. The definitive treatment required is a cardiac intervention to rectify the anatomical anomaly to optimize her growth as well as developmental potentials. Presently, facilities for the definitive treatment are not readily available in Nigeria, hence the need for Faheedat to go abroad for the treatment.

Salami said his daughter was on referral from a secondary health care facility after his wife had noticed cough from the second month of her life.

“We never imagined she would have to rely on public help because we thought she would get over the cough”, Salami told R.

After exhausting all means, Salami said it was time for the couple to seek assistance from Nigerians “who will gladly help us with N3 million to save the life of our little girl.”

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